Archive | July, 2014

Concealed Carry Handguns: You Can’t Just Have One!

31 Jul

Being able to mix up your regular carrying routing without sacrificing safety is a great way to stay sharp and on top of things. This means varying your carry style, holster, and even the gun you carry.

revolver

It can be easy to get stuck in a rut if you only carry the same gun with the same carry method, day in — day out.

Your brain can get so used to this routine that if any part of it changes, you are at a loss.

Failing to change up your routine can lead to complacency, which is dangerous.

In the grand scheme of things, good pistols for self-defense aren’t all that expensive. Their cost is miniscule in comparison to many other things you buy multiples of, such as vehicles. 

Often the gun buying process is approached with the mentality that the gun you ultimately end up buying is the Holy Grail. This will be the one gun you own and the only one you will ever carry. 

Unfortunately, this can pigeonhole your thinking. Some guns are better for certain situations and it is nice to have options when you’re buckling a weapon into place for the day.

Generally speaking, your choices are either some form of semi-automatic or a revolver. Before you discount the capability of revolvers as effective self-defense weapons for the 21st century, read what author Duane A. Daiker has to say about them in his article “Thunder Ranch Model 22: A Serious Carry Gun, Retro-Style!” on USConcealedcarry.com:

“Revolvers have come a long way from the fixed sight, carbon steel, square-butt revolvers of years gone by. New offerings from Smith & Wesson offer high-tech, lightweight frame and cylinder materials, recoil-absorbing soft rubber grips, bright, fiber-optic front sights, and even laser sights.” (Read more about revolvers at USConcealedCarry.com)

If you can afford to purchase one handgun for self-defense, then at some point down the road, you’ll probably be able to buy another one without breaking the bank. It’s sensible to have a few guns to choose from. Much like a selection of apparel, you can pick up the gun that suits you for any occasion on any given day.

And remember that like any other possession, handguns can be bought, sold, and traded for other weapons. This is often the most effective way to learn what guns you like the most since you’ve actually been able to own them for a time and have seen how they work in your day-to-day life.

Winning a Gunfight Means Getting the Most Accurate Shot Off First

9 Jul

For the sake of argument, imagine what it would be like if you learned to dguy aiming at targetsraw and fire concealed handguns from a very early age. At the same time you learned how to use silverware, button your shirt, and open doors, you would also be practicing and learning basic gun presentation skills.

Those acquired firearms skills would become a part of you. These skills would be as automatic as tying shoelaces.

Think about it — when was the last time you broke tying your shoelaces down into small steps and bit your tongue as you tried to remember the right knots? Probably not since you were very young.

Anyone who learned how to draw a concealed firearm at a young age would have a significant advantage in an armed encounter over someone who didn’t learn. For the early learner, the process would become second nature and require very little conscious thinking about the draw, aim, and firing of the weapon.

The point of this theoretical scenario is to illustrate the benefits of practicing your draw and firing skills until they become so automatic that you don’t have to consciously think about the acts themselves, leaving you free to focus on the threat.

Since almost no one has learned these skills as children, the good news is that you can pick them up as an adult with the proper application of practice and instruction.

Draw speed, fluidity, and smoothness all go hand-in-hand. Be careful of focusing only on getting your gun out quickly. The person who draws their weapon first is not always the winner.

The winner is the person who squeezes off the most accurate shot first. Your holster, carry style, and the smoothness of your draw all lay the foundation for that final accurate aim and shot.

Author Bruce N. Eimer, PH.D. talks about the theory of speeding up your draw in his article “The Need for Speed” on USConcealedcarry.com:

“Just because it happens to be a gun that you are pointing, [it] does not change the fact that the fastest path between two points is a fluid, smooth line. Drawing a gun just happens to be a natural human ability that does not have to be and should not be overcomplicated.” (Read more about speed and accuracy at USConcealedCarry.com)

As you are training and working on speeding up your draw? Try reversing your thinking on the process. Instead of thinking about how you can draw faster, try to identify what is slowing you down.

By removing things that slow you down, you can just as effectively speed up your draw.